Movie Poster: Rocky


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Movie Trailer: Sucker Punch

Zack Snyder's films are visual feasts. There is no one working who can touch him on his design work, even Terry Gilliam.

Visuals is nothing - story is everything. Snyder has problems with story. 300 was his best film because it mixed his design talents with a well structured and delivered story.

I fail to see any real story here. It certainly appears to be yet more content free moviemaking. Time will tell.



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Movie Trailer: The Smurfs

The riff they use in the soundtrack in this commercial for a children's movie - Tone Loc's Wild Thing, a song about Tone Loc having sex with a number of women and having a run in with a whore. A song sampling from Van Halen's Jamie's Cryin - A song about a girl who turns down a man who wants to have sex and is not upset over her choice.

What exactly are the Smurfs doing in this movie?



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Movie Poster: Luch Smerti "Death_Ray"


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Friday Rewind: 2012 (2009)

***Originally posted November 19, 2009***


Should I see it?
If your brain is not connected to your spinal column, then yes.


Short Review: It’s as bombastic as it is ill conceived, which is fancy way of saying its loud and stupid.


2012 movie poster
John Cusack is in his forties and is still playing half-man schlubs who can’t manage relationships. His character Jackson Curtis is broken down, broken-hearted and just plain broke. His ex-wife Kate (Amanda Peet) has left him. His kids loathe his mere presence. In a way, this film is like seeing Better Off Dead as done by Michael Bay.

This is a horrendous film.

Awful.

Lousy.

Thankfully it is also a bloated disaster movie so it doesn’t really matter. All the film has to do is flash lights to distract from its limping plot in order to be successful. The only reason to see this film is to watch the end of the world in glorious high definition. Writer/Director Roland Emmerich (Independence Day, Godzilla, 10,000 B.C.) promises to deliver the apocalypse with as few words as possible. He delivers on his promise.

What I found amazing is that Emmerich still bothers trying to shoehorn relationship issues into the end of days. At one point Jackson and Kate have a quiet moment together. She complains that Jackson spent too much time working and not enough time with his family. They literally just watched billions of people perish, the totality of human civilization has been destroyed and she is still nagging at the poor sap. I guess we can see why things didn't work out them.

The problem with trying to pull off character development in a film like this is that once you show the USS John F. Kennedy on a tsunami wave crashing into the White House and killing the President, it's a little much to ask us to care about the gripes from John Cusack’s ex-wife.

If you are only interested in seeing crashing buildings, ridiculous plot contrivances and perilous escapes, this will be a good pick. If you have the tendency to pause while watching movies and consider how reality actually works, you will probably still enjoy it because it’s dang funny from that angle.

I laughed constantly through the film. Here is a moment which sums up the film for me. Jackson is driving a limo through Los Angeles as the city is literally falling to pieces. A building crashes down in front of him. He jumps the limo into the side of the falling building, drives the car across a floor, speeding through a business office, crashes out of a window and manages to land safely on the highway on the other side. If you can handle that level of dumb, knock yourself out.


Worldview: I was struck by Emmerich's treatment of faith. Every once in a while someone would casually mention that “its time to start praying”. Other than these passing nods to the notion that some people may or may not possibly consider asking for mercy from something that maybe perhaps might be something kinda like a God or something or who knows what, there is a remarkable absence of any real faith. The President begins to quote scripture at one point, but he is cut off before he finishes. The world is ending, billions are dying, and the only references to Jesus Christ are when characters are cursing.

Emmerich is very deliberate in his presentation of religion in this film, particularly when it comes to the destruction of iconic places. Emmerich is given credit for popularizing the destruction of landmarks in action/disaster movies. The White House being blown up in Independence Day started the trend. Destroying the White House, Washington Monument, and other landmarks serves to pervert the “Death of God Image" I’ve discussed before.

In this film, Emmerich takes the Death of God Image and runs with it. He not only shows the Christ the Redeemer Statue in Brazil crumbling, but he stops the movie cold to spend time at the Vatican. Thousands of Catholics are crowded outside of Saint Peter’s Cathedral as the Pope looks down on them from the balcony. Inside, a collection of cardinals huddle in a circle praying. As the room begins to shake they look upward to see the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel (apparently its been moved). The ceiling cracks and splits, severing the famous fingers of God and Adam. Suddenly, the Saint Peter’s Basilica plops over on its side and rolls over all of the collected Catholics killing the faithful like a big rolling pin made out of cosmic irony.

Beyond the obvious “imagine if they did this to any other group” argument, I need to point out that Emmerich goes out of his way to avoid showing large groups of people in this film. All of L.A. is destroyed but we only witness a few dozen actual deaths. The crowds that are killed on screen are shown from vast distances or are represented by focusing tightly on the fearful face of a known character.

The deaths at the Vatican are the only crowd shown killed in a specific, almost devious way. This is not by accident. Emmerich himself admits that the destruction of religious locations is intentional – in particular his choice in showing Christians getting it.


When asked about destroying Christ the Redeemer Emmerich explains,

"Because I'm against organized religion,"

For those playing at home, here is the math: Catholics = Let's drop one of their most precious places on their stupid heads. Islam = Let's not upset the poor dears, otherwise they may start acting wonky and hurting people - can't imagine what that would be like.


Cautions: There's death and destruction. There's some foul language and a few instances of people taking Christ's name in vain. Beyond these infractions, there's not too much that is worth being cautioned over (regarding the content).



Once you see the film read what follows:

Two items:

Congratulations! The good news: you’ve been cast in a huge Hollywood blockbuster. The bad news: Your character arc is that you learn to stop peeing the bed at night.

So, the world’s elite are given the chance to buy a seat on the arks. In the end the world leaders come together to allow some stranded folk into their ships. This is used to show how we maintain our humanity. Yeah, about that, the stranded people are also rich elites who also bought their way onto the arks. So, other than some Chinese slaves, the survivors of humanity are all billionaires. Each have drained their resources from the rest of the world so they could comfortably survive the hell on Earth they left for everyone else. The worst of humanity gets to live. Nice message.


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Movie Trailer: The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King (2003)

A very strong ad. It shows the story without revealing too much or going on too long.

I love the shot they chose to introduce Shelob - creepy.


Movie Trailer: The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers (2002)

Unlike the trailer for Lord of the Rings: Fellowship of the Ring, which was well done, this trailer is below average. It goes on way too long, exposes too much about the story and lays down atmosphere or intrigue for the audience. This is simply a Cliffs Notes version of the film with titleboards tossed in to remind you it's a trailer.

This trailer also downplays the presence of Gollum in the story. He's in the a couple of times, but as one of the major players and one of the more visually striking ones at that, one would expect for him to be a bigger display in the ads.

Become a Leader Without Followers

If you have been called to be a leader, start leading immediately. If you have been called you need to become a leader without followers. Do what you would do if your statements and actions were being tracked by thousands of people. Plot your route and recite your cause. Prepare yourself by acting like the person you have been called to become. Do these things and your followers will find you and you will be prepared for when they arrive.

Movie Poster: Dr. Mabuse: The Gambler


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Movie Trailer: The White Stripes Under Great White Northern Lights

Meh.

Bottom line - movies about musicians are almost all completely useless. They are advertisements (read music videos) with credit sequences.



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Brokeback Mountain (2005)

Should I see it?
Don't bother. I watched it so you won't have to.


Short Review: Sometimes there are moments when the fast-forward button ain't fast enough.


I just sat there muttering, “Well, I don’t do that.”

It is easy to mock this film. It’s about gay cowboys (for you hypersensitive clods, yes I know they are sheepherders and there is a difference - settle down), the jokes are inherent. Furthermore, it is difficult to speak about this film without falling into juvenile double entendres (not that I’m above being juvenile.) Much of this has to do with the average person's reaction to homosexuality in particular when it is hung over a mismatched environment. Even more of this has to do with the unbelievably stupid marketing that surrounded the release of this film.

Much has been said about the agenda framing this production and I have nothing new to add there. The main thrust of the piece is to deconstruct the American image of the cowboy. The point is to muddy the image. This is the well-worn path of post modernists. Impulsively reject a social construct, then remake it in your image by lowering its standards. Once the image has been dismantled, you can shove in a new icon or idea that is more to your liking. By now this kind of redefining of American culture, language and attitudes has become tedious in most respects. We have seen it constantly throughout the past decades. Superheroes like Superman and Batman are no longer heroic, they're conflicted and dark (Superman Returns, The Dark Knight). Cowboys don't wear white and black hats, they're either wolves or sheep being led to the same slaughterhouse (3:10 to Yuma).

This deconstruction is nearly mocked in this case. It is so over overwhelmingly obvious that the icon image of the rugged American man, in full cowboyesque dress is being tampered with and on purpose.

Ennis (Heath Ledger) and Jack (Jake Gyllenhaal) are sheep herders who fall in lust while monitoring a herd on Brokeback Mountain. These two characters could have been in any line of work, surrounded by nearly any environment, and this story would have still worked. The choice to make them rugged, outdoorsmen who are easily mistaken for cowboys is an intentional move - a move done to challenge our iconic thoughts and sully them publicly.

The social marketing aspect of this film is a shame because this is a fully realized and forceful film. Particularly impress is Heath Ledger who proved himself to be one of the best actors of his generation in his role as Ennis, a mealy mouthed loner who apparently likes to ride the range. Ledger coupled with Ang Lee’s masterful direction and Rodrigo Prieto’s heart stopping cinematography makes this one of the better made films of 2005.

But then there is all of that gay sex stuff.

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Listen, I’ll be honest, I’m not reflectively against exploring all aspects of human behavior in art. The human experience is rich and interesting and should be discussed in film, but let’s be real about it. It’s one thing to speak to homosexual behavior, it's another to shove it down the audience’s throat.

This is by its nature a controversial film, but the way it was marketed was disgusting. At first it the whole gay cowboy thing was ignored and the original commercials simply played up the images of men herding their sheep. Once poor grandma and grandpa were lured in thinking they were getting a western to find two guys locking stirrups, the ads changed. The Oscars were coming* around and there ads splashed around claiming this to be the “date movie” of the year. No guy in his right mind is ever taking his lady out to see two confused sheepherders play slap and tickle. The first set of ads lied by omission and the second set just lied outright.

Something that irritates me about this film is people’s reaction. Liberals and gays tend to tried to use this as a social barometer of how “accepting” America was towards homosexuality. If you have issues with this film you’re a homophobe. If you mock the stupidity at the heart of the film, you’re hateful. This is unfair. The concept of two apparently straight (or at least one of them is) cowboys falling in love while on the job and doing whatever it is they do when they get together was laughable. Which explains why every one was laughing. This film was not a reflection on American values it was a reflection on how out of touch the elite class was with the world.

While there are many honest and believable moments, the relationship at the middle of the story is flimsy. The initial homosexual encounter between the two main characters Ennis and Jack Twist in the infamous “pup tent scene” is inorganic to say the least. I think we can assume that two men who supposedly are tough cowboys don’t rush into a homosexual adventure without due diligence. Even if they did, the way it leaves a bad taste in my mouth.

The two guys are just hanging out and then decide to go for a test drive? I don’t know about you, but I’ve never been that drunk. Furthermore, the two leads don’t have a deep enough emotional connection to support the notion these two men being obsessed with one another of twenty years. If we’re to understand their love for one another, the roots of that love are not explained or shown. If it were simply lust and lust wouldn’t sustain the hell these two guys are forced to inhabit.

Speaking of hell, I watched the whole film. I do have to admit I found a surprisingly moral message if taken a certain way. The two men have an “encounter” otherwise known as “rough gay sex” up on Brokeback Mountain and spend the rest of their lives drowning in their obsession for one another. Their “love” destroys their lives and the lives of their families. I found this film to be less about homosexuality (actually these guys are bisexual but who’s keeping count) and more about sin.

The two guys commit a sin on Brokeback Mountain and ruin their lives trying to retain that moment. In fairness to the production, this is hardly an advertisement for homosexual behavior, as many believe it to be. While the film makes some lame attempts to blame the horror of these men’s lives on society not allowing their love to speak its name - it ends showing what happens to those who are unable to turn from their selfish desires.

Do I recommend this film? No.

That no in place, I do have to admit this is a very well-done film and it has a humanity to it that is undeniable. The problem is that the bloated agenda at the core is undeniable. This is a social marketing movie. If one is able to get over the homosexual scenes (see my short review) and look at this film from the standpoint of sin more than gayness, one may get something from this production. Then again, dropping the homosexual aspects of this film is like trying to drop all of that icky “holocaust stuff” from Schindler’s List.


Related Reviews:
Heath Ledger movies
The Imaginarium of Doctor Parnassus (2009)
Casanova (2005)


Other Critic's Reviews:
Decent Films Guide
Roger Ebert



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You Are What You See:
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Point the Right Direction

To see the path laid out for you, you must first understand you've begun a journey.

Stop wandering through your life. Reset your internal compass and start to walk with direction. Even if you don't know where you are headed, trust in God. He will let you know when you get there.

Movie Poster: The Eye

Movie Trailer: The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring (2001)

I find it interesting how much the trailer relies on the heroic archetype to sell the movie. This is a perfect execution of how to sell a story based on the heroic journey. They establish the opening act conflicts

  • Open with the normal, fertile world (shown in the opening shot of the trees)
  • The conflict (read evil) enters into the clean world - via the ring
  • The hero (Frodo) is told of the conflict
  • He refuses
  • He begins the journey and collects his allies
  • End with a montage of conflicts and moments of peril with promises of strange and frightening villains.

Perfect.

Movie Poster: Lawrence of Arabia


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Pinocchio (1940)

Should I see it?
Absolutely.



My children love this story. Given how truly subversive, or just plain awful, kids entertainment is these days, the old Disney classics are great to have around.

One thing that strikes me watching the movie as an adult is that the actors are the bad guys in the story. As they explain in the film, an actor’s life is one of selfish irresponsibility and is essentially hollow and meaningless. I like that. I like that a great deal.

If you have children, this is a safe, harmless ditty. Be mindful that Pinocchio does smoke a cigar and drink beer which may upset some parents. But those parents probably need to settle down. It is okay by me; my boys have a running shot of seeing me with a cigar and beer. As long as they don't partake until they are men, we're fine.




My long-suffering wife has just interjected that my children are also prone to seeing me turn into a jackass. That doesn't make being a jerk acceptable. Point taken.


Related Reviews:
Other animated movies
The Incredibles (2004)
Bambi (1942)

Other Critic's Reviews:
Decent Films Guide
Rotten Tomatoes



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Movie Poster: The Manchurian Candidate


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Das Leben Der Anderen "The Lives of Others" (2006)

Reviewer: Scott Nehring


The Lives of Others PosterShould I see it?
Absolutely.


Short Review: The only mistakes the Germans make are the big ones.


Director: Florian Henckel von Donnersmarck
Written by: Florian Henckel von Donnersmarck
Starring: Ulrich Mühe, Martina Gedeck and Sebastian Koch


Rated R for sexuality and nudity


Rent or Buy This Movie HereRent The Lives of Others


Communism left a wake of nearly 100,000,000 people killed and we still have slack-jawed losers mincing around campuses with Che Guevara t-shirts claiming "real communism hasn't been tried yet". The communist ideal is inhuman – it rubs against the grain of human nature and simply does not work. It always has and always will lead to a heavy handed government brutally shoving its citizens into lockstep whenever it is tried. This film is one of the most frank attacks on this system.

Writer/Director Florian Henckel von Donnersmarck provides an enthralling film about a lonely Stasti interrogator who gets wrapped up in the lives of a playwright and his actress girlfriend when he begins to spy on them for the government. The story is as engaging and thoughtful as any I have seen. I know of no one who has watched this film and hasn't been touched by the tormented lives of the characters. Looking beyond the politics of the film, this is simply a masterful character piece and that is where the film draws much of its power. With careful guidance by von Donnersmarck the characters slowly smother under the the heavy hand of their government. They each yearn to speak and think freely just as human beings were meant to live.

The Lives of Others

As much as I adored von Donnersmarck’s direction and script, the film really belongs to the actors. Ulrich Mühe who portrays Hauptmann Gerd Wiesler, the dyed in the wool Stasti officer, provides a masterful performance. He is at once a meek, confused man, conversely, he is also a powerful and cruel agent for the state. As the story progresses and his defenses begin to crumble, Mühe manages to expose the psychological distress of this man while not having much dialog. The fact that he doesn't speak much throughout the film makes Mühe’s performance more striking. To be able to draw the audience in, to be able to give such an emotional performance even though your character doesn't speak and essentially is an observer to the world around him is a remarkable feat.

The Lives of Others

Mühe’s work would have been for nothing without a strong supporting cast. Sebastian Koch and Martina Gedeck play the investigated playwright and his actress girlfriend. They are the subjects of Wiesler’s occupation and obsession. They are tasked with fleshing out the narrative and visually carrying much of the film. While Wiesler is the center of the piece, the relationship between these two lovers is what energizes the entire film. Both actors offer a worthy counter weight to Mühe’s landmark performance.

The film is clearly one of the best films of the 2000's. It is shocking that Hollywood ignored this film. Yes, it won Best Foreign Language at the Oscars – but no Best Actor, Best Director? Best Picture – this powerful movie is a thousand times better than The Departed which received all the attention in 2007. No Golden Globes. This film won no other American awards of note. Quite honestly, it is flabbergasting that this piece isn’t held in higher esteem. Regardless of Hollywood’s natural inclination to support criminal regimes – in particular communist ones – the sheer cinematic power of this film should have cut through all of that nonsense.

The next time you have some half-brained dimwit wetting their pants over how “oppressed” they feel, show them this film. Yes, there has been real oppression in the world and yes, there still is. Much of these political horror stories have come from movements of the left. Communism and its cousin socialism have destroyed more lives than any other human fantasy. This film not only indicts these political thoughts but also indicts those who still defend them.



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Movie Poster: District 9


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Movie Trailer: The Social Network

This is David Fincher's latest. I wish he'd go back and find that guy who made Se7en, The Game and Fight Club. I don't see how a biography about the guy who created Facebook is going to be interesting. I'm willing to give Fincher his due and assume he knows what he's doing, but I can't think of a more shrug inducing topic.

The trailer itself stinks. It doesn't tell you what the movie is about, it assumes you know - bad idea. It also doesn't explain what the conflict is, who is involved or why we should care.




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Movie Trailer: Charlie St. Cloud

So, its about a hallucinating, male model who risks his life to stalk some chick on the high seas? Wha?




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Movie Poster: The Magnificent Seven


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Movie Trailer: Red

Conventional trailer. Looks like typical Hollywood slop.

Someone with Helen Mirren's talent - it just seems a shame to see her in stuff like this.





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Movie Trailer: Paranormal Activity 2

...because there were so many unanswered questions from the original Paranormal Activity.

Actually, this is a rather effective trailer. They were smart to include the shots of the audience. It is a little trick they pulled with the original release.

It is also a smart touch to put the kid in the closing shots.



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Movie Poster: Godzilla, Minilla, Gabara: All Monster's Attack


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Movie Trailer: Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part I

The trailer seems to mistake "popular" with "important". Yes, this movie will make oodles of cash but, like the films before it, it will pass into memory.

I've enjoyed the films up to this point and think they are quite well done. The truth is that this series is not great cinema nor memorable pap pop culture. It is a marketing campaign coming to a close.

It is interesting to note that as the characters get older and approach adulthood, the darker and gloomier the stories have become. Granted, this follows traditional story structure. This does show a guttural response to the acceptance of adulthood as well, in my estimation.



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Carnival of Cinema: Episode 111

Welcome to this installment of the Carnival of Cinema. Every two weeks we get together to present the best film-related posts from around the world.



MOVIE REVIEWS

Inception is the release getting the attention this week in the Carnival. Sit back and enjoy a slew of reviews on Nolan's latest yarn.

Jason McKinnon sums up nearly every review of the film by claiming, "Every once in a while, a movie comes along that delivers on the enormous hype it created." Click over to THE ATHLETIC NERD for more.


THE VIDEO DETECTIVE holds similar views. Video Detective also has a post about the possible casting of the role of The Riddler in the third Nolan Batman movie. Need more? Go check out this post about Inception and some other releases.


DR. DEB has a more thoughtful view of Inception - yes, pun intended.


Madge Knight of BEST FOR FILM has an article on Inception. She seems less than overwhelmed. Click over to find out why.

Sick of hearing about Inception, Inception, Inception? How about dropping back a week and getting the drop on Predators? Dann of 100 WORDS OR LESS has exactly 100 words on the rehashed flick.

100 words? Heck, I can sum the movie up in two words. Then again, neither words can be expressed in mixed company.


Let's change course and point away from Hollywood for a moment and check out a film that was screened at the Berlinale this year. Road Movie is the subject of Nitin Sinha's review over at DOUBLETHINK.


Our next review is of the documentary Hori Smoku Sailor Jerry: The Life of Norman K. Collins. Never heard of it? You have now. Go to OMAHA EVENT NEWS and read Jordy Clements' take on the screening of the film.


The final review this week is for Twilight: Eclipse. Eric Gargiulo of CAMEL CLUTCH BLOG has the review.

If you don't want to bother actually seeing Twilight: Eclipse, you can just shortcut the process and simply check out Tito Adjianto's explanation of the plot at GRAFISTHY NEWS.


INDUSTRY ADVICE

Carnival regular, Conan Stevens returns this week with a post explaining how he secured a major role in a new HBO TV series. Visit his site CONAN STEVENS WORLD'S BIGGEST ACTION HERO? for this post and other insights into the life of a working actor.


Want to see a movie being made? You can also visit CARTOON JR. There Wendy provides some tips to hunt down local filming locations and to see movies being made.

LISTS

There is only one list post this week.

URBAN CANDY SHOP has compiled a list of their favorite actresses with guns in the movies.


MOVIE NEWS

Need a good round up of the latest movie news? Melina Corrado of MELINA GEEKLY has a good post laying the latest out for you. Click over to read more.


Thanks to everyone for their posts.


...and CUT and PRINT!


To submit your film-related post to next week's edition, FOLLOW THIS LINK.








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The Carnival of Cinema is intended to increase readership and availability of a broad range of opinions. This wide selection means that not all opinions will be correct or stated well. The content on the sites linked to in this post are not the responsibility of Good News Film Reviews.
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